The Reflective Teacher

It’s back to school time! Today’s Best Blog looks at school from a teacher’s perspective. And who better to talk about what it’s like to face a classroom of eager (and not so eager) faces than The Reflective Teacher?

Why is this a Best Blog?

  • The usual reasons: well written, frequently updated, a real voice.
  • And a new reason (although one we’ve noticed before): a useful blogroll. Many things on that blogroll will make you want to take a further look, especially if you’re interested in education.

(By the way: We’d like to feature a student’s blog next — if you have a nomination, feel free to leave a comment — and don’t forget to say why it’s a Best Blog.)

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20 Responses to “The Reflective Teacher”


  1. 1 Nobodyknows 27 August, 2006 at 1:21 am

    Wow! Never thought I make it on this list. Thanks for the recognition!

  2. 2 Vicki Davis 31 August, 2006 at 6:34 pm

    I’d like to nominate http://kyli.wordpress.com/ as a great student blog. She started this and has posted largely on her own about important issues to teenagers. While other students resort to immature kneejerk reactions to legislation such as DOPA and the SAT length insanity, this teenager creates well versed, meaningful posts about important teenage issues. This type of teenage blogging deserves recognition.

  3. 3 elementaryhistoryteacher 1 September, 2006 at 5:47 am

    Great choice. The Reflective Teacher is top notch!

  4. 4 arick 1 September, 2006 at 6:20 am

    I’d like to nominate Wandering Pedestrians as a great student blog. Firstly, it is updated regularly. Secondly, it addresses issues in school, current events, religion, science, and life. It isn’t just “kneejerk reactions to legislation such as DOPA and SAT length insanity.” And if it was, then this is how students really feel about them. Raw. No back editing. Straight from the students mouth. Also, none of the blog entries are “assigned.” Everything is just completely up to what the student thinks. At that moment. These people are real and unafraid of what others think of the blog.

    I am deeply offended that Vicki Davis states that this blog was “kneejerk reactions to… DOPA.” Then, mysteriously, kyli.wordpress.com suddenly has an article about DOPA. Assigned, mysteriously, by a teacher. Vicki Davis, mysteriously is a teacher. In fact, many of the points argued in kyli was the exact same as the one argued in Wandering Pedestrians. I am offended that such actions exist today. What makes the article done by Wandering Pedestrians different? Especially, since Wandering Pedestrians did the article a month ago, it shows who is really up with current events and who is merely reiterating thoughts without giving credit.

  5. 5 Vicki Davis 1 September, 2006 at 7:22 am

    Kyli does not have anything assigned. This is a blog that she does on her own. If it were assigned, she’d have weekly posts. I just enjoy reading it and was trying to do something nice for her. I don’t even teach her this year and haven’t taught her since june. That is what makes the blog so beautiful to me.

    I don’t even know what blog that arick is talking about or that I would insinuate that her blog Wandering pedestrians had a knee jerk reaction. Kyli’s article was in July, I think.

    I’m sorry that “arick” is deeply offended but I haven’t even read Wandering Pedestrians, nor do I know what this person is so upset about. I think that perhaps Kyli’s article may predate the Wandering Pedestrians article.

    I think that this is the kneejerk reactions that I try to teach my students not to have. I do not like flame wars nor people who read too much into the posts of others.

    I was simply trying to say that Kyli is a reflective person. She knew about DOPA in May and took a while to chew on it and come up with her opinions.

    Best wishes to Wandering Pedestrians! I’ve never heard of them but certainly will go look at them. I love to encourage students and would never wish them to compete. There is so much room in the blogosphere. It is such a great place for us to teach effective Internet citizenship, which includes checking the facts and never attributing lack of character to people we do not even know. That is what is offensive. “Arick” I think it is perhaps you who have acted unkindly and I’m sorry you felt the need to do so!

  6. 6 Vicki Davis 1 September, 2006 at 7:24 am

    Arick, your hyperlink doesn’t work. I look forward to checking back to see this great student blog.

  7. 7 arick 1 September, 2006 at 7:38 am

    Vicki Davis, I’m so sorry. I didn’t mean anything by it. I’m sorry. It’s just that I did post something on here before, and I thought it was deleted or something and that you might have reffered to it. I am so deeply sorry. I’m sorry, I didn’t check the date on Kyli’s post. I really hope you accept this. I’ve just had a bad week in school… :(

    http://wanderingpedestrians.wordpress.com

  8. 8 Vicki Davis 1 September, 2006 at 8:31 am

    All is forgiven. Best wishes on your blogging!

  9. 9 bloglily 1 September, 2006 at 9:45 am

    Now that’s a textbook example of a beautifully handled blogging moment. Vicki Davis, I want my kids to be in your classes. And Arick, I’m so impressed by your willingness to apologize. That’s not something you see very often. If it happened more, we’d have a lot less trouble in our world. Thank you both for your nominations.

  10. 10 arick 1 September, 2006 at 10:17 am

    Thanks bloglily. I’m actually kind of embarassed about the whole thing. I feel really bad for jumping the gun like that. This has really been one terrible day for me…

  11. 11 bloglily 1 September, 2006 at 11:11 am

    we all have those kinds of days, and you shouldn’t feel embarrassed for an instant. You did the right thing and that counts. I have also pressed that send button, much to my regret! (Hope your bad day improves…) Best, BL

  12. 12 nukes 7 September, 2006 at 8:53 am

    I have one question: how do we find out if a blogis made by a student?

  13. 13 Vicki Davis 7 September, 2006 at 9:30 pm

    If they are in my class, you can’t unless I tell you because I try to teach them to protect their profile and not put their age. I guess you have to be their teacher.

  14. 14 bloglily 8 September, 2006 at 12:22 am

    I’m sorry — I don’t think that request was quite clear. By “student blog” I mean a blog whose subject is, at least some of the time, student life. In a few days, we’ll have one up, and then perhaps you’ll have a better idea of what we have in mind. Many thanks Nukes for asking for clarification!

  15. 16 bsmith 10 September, 2006 at 1:52 am

    I’ve found that conjunction-junction.wordpress.com is also a great teacher blog.

  16. 17 bonnieq 14 September, 2006 at 10:12 am

    I know one of the best teachers around, in Connecticut that is. She is the kind of teacher every student should have. Check out the blog of Joanne Tolles at http://jtolles.wordpress.com

    BonnieQ http://bonnieq.wordpress.com

  17. 18 Helen nanney 5 October, 2006 at 3:46 pm

    Teens speaking out, finally, a place they can be heard. Spout off, be funny, be serious, be yourself. Being a teen is not easy, try being a senior citizen. keep writing, thinking, and bloging, just stay out of trouble and life is a blitz.

  18. 19 muhabbet 21 February, 2007 at 3:59 am

    So here is teachers room :)


  1. 1 Best Blog? Doubt it. « the reflective teacher Trackback on 31 August, 2006 at 11:15 am

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